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Trump Ratings – Still Decidedly Negative – Edge Up

Trump Ratings – Still Decidedly Negative – Edge Up

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Trump Ratings – Still Decidedly Negative – Edge Up
 
Voters Remain Concerned About Russian Involvement in Election; Majority Want Investigation Concluded, 4 in 10 Now Say ‘Enough’

Two-Thirds Want Obamacare Kept & Improved; Only 12% Say Senate Should Pass Bill Similar to House Bill with Only Republican Support

Putin Doesn’t Have Worst Favorability Rating in Siena History, But It’s Close

Loudonville, NY.  President Donald Trump is viewed favorably by 34 percent of New Yorkers and unfavorably by 62 percent, up a little from a negative 30-65 percent favorability rating in May. Thirty percent give Trump a positive job performance rating and 68 percent rate him negatively, including 52 percent who say he’s doing a ‘poor’ job as President, up slightly from a negative 27-71 percent job performance rating in May, according to a new Siena College Poll of New York State registered voters released today.

By a 64-35 percent margin, voters say they’re concerned about Russia’s attempt to sway last year’s election, down a little from 68-31 percent in May. And while 56 percent want a thorough investigation concluded, down from 68 percent in May, 41 percent say it’s been investigated enough, up from 30 percent.

On Obamacare, 65 percent want it kept and improved, compared to 32 percent who want it repealed and replaced (little changed from 67-30 percent in May). Only 12 percent of voters say the Senate should pass a bill similar to the House bill with just Republican support, while 37 percent want no bill passed and Obamacare kept, and
44 percent want the Senate to pass a bill that can garner support from Democrats and Republicans.

“Although President Trump remains largely unpopular with his fellow New Yorkers, both his favorability and job performance ratings ticked up since May. While Democrats and Republicans appear to be locked in – 83 percent of Democrats view Trump unfavorably and 71 percent of Republicans view him favorably – independent voters are more fluid in their views of the President. While 57 percent of independents currently have an unfavorable view of Trump, that’s down from 71 percent in May,” said Siena College pollster Steven Greenberg.

“Still, two-thirds of New Yorkers – including 85 percent of Democrats, 64 percent of independents and at least 62 percent of voters from every region – give Trump a negative job performance rating,” Greenberg said.

“In addition to his negative overall job performance rating, Trump gets negative reviews from New Yorkers for the job he did at the recent G-20 summit overall, as well as his specific dealings with America’s European allies and in his first meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin,” Greenberg said.

Voters give Trump a negative 31-63 percent job performance rating for his handling of the G-20 summit, a negative 31-65 percent rating for his work with European allies at the summit, and a negative 29-61 percent rating for his first meeting with Putin, who is viewed favorably by 10 percent of voters and unfavorably by 73 percent.

“While New Yorkers give Putin an abysmal favorability rating, it’s not quite as bad as the lowest-ever favorability rating in a Siena College poll. In March 2008, 79 percent of voters viewed Eliot Spitzer unfavorably immediately after his resignation as governor,” Greenberg said. “Trump’s lowest was 72 percent last August.”

Strong Concern About Russian Election Meddling Remains; Still Support for Investigation, but Smaller

By a 64-35 percent margin, down a little from 68-31 percent in May, voters are concerned that Russia attempted to sway last year’s presidential election. Now, 56 percent want to see a thorough investigation concluded, compared to 41 percent who say it’s been investigated enough, down from 68-30 percent in May.

“Three-quarters of Democrats say both that they are concerned and want a thorough investigation,” Greenberg said. “Among Republicans, nearly two-thirds are not concerned and nearly three-quarters say enough investigations, let’s move on. Almost two-thirds of independents are concerned, however, they are closely divided on whether to continue the investigation, 51-46 percent, down sharply from 69-27 percent in May.”

Little Support for Senate Republicans’ Healthcare Bill; Two-Thirds Still Say Keep/Improve Obamacare

By a 65-32 percent margin – down only slightly from May – voters prefer to keep and improve the Affordable Care Act – Obamacare – rather than repeal and replace it. Only 12 percent of New Yorkers want the Senate to pass a healthcare bill similar to the House bill, while 44 percent want the Senate to pass a bill with support from Republicans and Democrats, and 37 percent want the Senate to not act and leave Obamacare in place as is.

“Healthcare continues to divide voters – largely along partisan lines. Sixty percent of independents and 83 percent of Democrats want to keep and improve Obamacare, while 68 percent of Republicans want it repealed and replaced,” Greenberg said. “There is little support for the healthcare bill the Senate had been considering, even among Republicans. Only 27 percent of Republicans want the Senate to pass a bill similar to the House bill, while 47 percent would like to see a bipartisan healthcare bill passed in the Senate.”


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This Siena College Poll was conducted July 9-13, 2017 by telephone calls conducted in English to 793 New York State registered voters. Respondent sampling was initiated by asking for the youngest male in the household.  It has an overall margin of error of + 4.0 percentage points including the design effects resulting from weighting. Sampling was conducted via a stratified dual frame probability sample of landline and cell phone telephone numbers (both from Survey Sampling International) from within New York State weighted to reflect known population patterns. Data was statistically adjusted by age, party, region and gender to ensure representativeness.  The Siena College Research Institute, directed by Donald Levy, Ph.D., conducts political, economic, social and cultural research primarily in NYS. SCRI, an independent, non-partisan research institute, subscribes to the American Association of Public Opinion Research Code of Professional Ethics and Practices. For more information, call Steve Greenberg at (518) 469-9858. For survey cross-tabs: www.Siena.edu/SCRI/SNY.