Rose A. Finn

Professor of Physics

Phone: (518) 782‑6764
Email: rfinn@siena.edu


Degrees:

Ph.D. Astronomy University of Arizona
M.S. Physics Dartmouth College
B.A. Astronomy-Physics University of Virginia

Bio:

Rose Finn received a Bachelor’s of Arts in Astronomy-Physics from the University of Virigina and a Master’s of Science in Physics from Dartmouth College. She then taught 8th through 12th grade science at the Albany Academy for Girls for three years before continuing her graduate studies at the University of Arizona, where she received her PhD in astronomy in 2003. As a graduate student, Rose was awarded a Space Grant Fellowship and a NASA Graduate Student Researchers Program fellowship. Upon completing her Ph.D., she was awarded a National Science Foundation Astronomy and Astrophysics Post-doctoral Fellowship, which she took to the University of Massachusetts. Rose joined the faculty of Siena College in 2005 as the first tenure-track woman in the Physics Department. In 2009, Rose was awarded a CAREER award by the National Science Foundation; the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program is the National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations. Dr. Finn has also received other research grants from NASA..

What I love about Siena:

There are two main reasons why I love teaching at Siena: great students and small class sizes. My first year, I thought I was lucky because I taught a group of students who worked hard, participated in class, and were just fun to spend time with. I now realize that this wasn’t luck - this is just what most of our Siena students are like. Of course I might not know this if our classes contained 100 students! I could never imagine myself teaching a class with one or two hundred students. The small class sizes at Siena allow me to make classes interactive, and I am able to get to know my students academically and personally.

My Favorite courses to teach are:

My favorite classes to teach are General Physics and Introductory Astronomy. General Physics is just fun - we do lots of hands-on activities and we cover a broad range of topics. I enjoy Introductory Astronomy because astronomy is the reason I am a scientist! I also enjoy the opportunity to teach and interact with liberal arts and business majors.

Professional Experience:

Assistant Professor of Physics Siena College 2005 - Now
Postdoctoral Fellow , Astronomy & Astrophysics University of Massachusetts 2003 - 2005
Science Teacher Albany Academy for Girls 1994 - 1997

Why I chose Siena:

I chose Siena because I was drawn by the opportunity to help the physics department transition from a teaching-focused department to what it is now - a department that still embraces excellence in teaching while also promoting active research among faculty and students. The transformation has been remarkable, and our strong and diverse research programs have helped attract an outstanding group of physics majors.

My current research:

Rose’s research focuses on understanding how a galaxy is influenced by the environment in which it lives.

My teaching philosophy:

I strongly believe in an active, student-focused approach to teaching. This was not my philosophy when I started teaching 16 years ago; I have continually experimented with various teaching techniques, and I have observed that student-centered teaching is more effective and more enjoyable than traditional techniques. As a result, I have tried to implement this as much as possible at Siena.


Nebular Attenuation in H?-selected Star-forming Galaxies at z = 0.8 from the NewH? Survey
Astronomical Journal
2013
Cold gas in the inner regions of intermediate redshift clusters
Astronomy & Astrophysics
2013
Average Metallicity and Star Formation Rate of Ly? Emitters Probed by a Triple Narrowband Survey
Astrophysical Journal
2011
The H? Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate Volume Density at z = 0.8 from the NEWFIRM H? Survey
Astrophysical Journal
2011
The evolution of the density of galaxy clusters and groups: denser environments at higher redshifts
MNRAS
2010
Comparing the Relation Between Star Formation and Galaxy Mass in Different Environments
Astrophysical Journal
2010
HI Content of the MKW 10 Group Galaxies
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2010
Incidence and Properties of Merging Systems in Ten EDisCS Galaxy Clusters
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2010
Evolution of Star Formation From Spitzer MIPS Imaging of Moderate Redshift Galaxy Clusters
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2010
Evolution of Galaxy Cluster Luminosity Functions at Moderate Redshift in the IRAC Bands
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2010
Evolution of Cluster Scaling Relations with Near-infrared and Spitzer Imaging
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2010
Newfirm H Galaxy survey: Deep Follow-up Spectroscopy of z=0.8 Star Forming Galaxies
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2010
Dust-Obscured Star-Formation in Intermediate Redshift Galaxy Clusters
Astrophysical Journal
2009
The ESO Distant Cluster Sample: Galaxy Evolution and Environment out to z = 1
The Messenger
2009
A Comparison of UV and Ha Star Formation Rates In Intermediate Redshift Galaxies
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts
2009
Ha Luminosity Functions and Star Formation Rate Volume Densities at z=0.8
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts
2009
Extending Deep H-alpha Galaxy Surveys to Higher Redshift with NEWFIRM
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts
2009
The Relation between Star Formation, Morphology, and Local Density in High-Redshift Clusters and Groups
Astrophysical Journal
2008
Mass and Redshift Dependence of Star Formation in Relaxed Galaxy Clusters
Astrophysical Journal
2008
Effect of Night Laboratories on Learning Objectives for a Nonmajor Astronomy Class
Astronomy Education Review
2008
An Extremely Massive Dry Merger in a Moderate Redshift Cluster
Astrophysical Journal
2007
Comparison Of UV And H-alpha SFR Indicators At Intermediate Redshift: Extraction Of H-alpha Fluxes From Near-IR Narrowband Imaging
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts
2007
Ha-Derived Star-Formation Rates for three z = 0.75 EDisCS Galaxy Clusters
Astrophysical Journal
2005
Ha-Derived Star-Formation Rates for the z = 0.845 Galaxy Cluster CLJ0023+0423B
Astrophysical Journal
2004
Integrated Star-Formation Rates of the C4 Galaxy Cluster Sample
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2004
The Surprisingly Sparse Environments of Optically Selected Quasars
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2004
Ha-derived Star Formation Rates of 0.6 < z < 0.8 Galaxy Clusters
Clusters of Galaxies: Probes of Cosmological Structure and Galaxy Evolution
2004
Ha Star-Formation Rates for the z = 0.84 Galaxy Cluster CLJ0023+0423B
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2003
Probing the Triggering & Fueling Mechanisms for Quasars
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2003
Ha -Derived Star-Formation Rates of 0.6 < z < 0.8 Galaxy Clusters
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
2002
PISCES A Wide Field, 1 - 2µm Camera for Large Aperture Telescopes
Proceedings of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific
2001
'WFPC2 Imaging of Quasar Environments A Comparison of Large Bright Quasar Survey and Hubble Space Telescope Archive Quasars
Astrophysical Journal
2001
Galaxies in the Fields of z 1.5 Radio-Loud Quasars
Astronomical Journal
2001
WFPC2 Imaging of Quasar Environments: a comparison of LBQS and HST archive quasars
QSO Hosts and Their Environments
2001
Wide-Field, R and H Band Imaging of Quasar Environments
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
1998
A Wide-Field Camera for 1-2.5mu M Imaging at the 2.3 and 6.5m Telescopes
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
1998
Optical Spectra of SN 1993J During the First 500 Days
Astronomical Journal
1995
Optical Spectra of SN 1993J During the First Week
Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society
1993