Course Descriptions

With the exception of courses in the professional sequence, Education courses are open to all students.

EDUC—210. Issues in Contemporary American Education 3 credits
This introductory course orients the student to the professional field of education and schooling in the United States. Issues researched and discussed include but are not limited to the following: history and philosophy of education; purpose and role of public education; rights and responsibilities of all educational stakeholders; governance at the local, state, and federal level; and interactions among the school, home, and community that support and enhance student learning. In particular, this course will explore the issue of educational access, emphasizing student diversity within the full range of disabilities and special needs. A ten-hour field experience is required (Transportation is the responsibility of each student); for students pursuing Siena’s certification sequence, the field experience must be at the secondary level (grades 7-12). (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—220. Democracy and Pluralism in American Education-3 credits
Offered when there is sufficient student interest
This course will analyze developments in American education from the colonial period to the present. Since educational theories and systems create and are created by the social, intellectual, economic, and political milieu, educational developments will be viewed in the light of important trends in American society. Attention will be given to fundamental ideological questions including the relationship of power and participation to education and instruction in a democratic society. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—225. Historical and Sociological Foundations of Western Education-3 credits
Offered when there is sufficient student interest
This course provides the student with an historical perspective as an aid to understanding contemporary education. It will deal with major educational ideas beginning with ancient Greece and continuing to modern times. It seeks to show the close relationship between education and political, social, and economic forces as well as to develop the impact of science on education. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—230. Philosophy of Education-3 credits 
Offered when there is sufficient student interest
In this course, each student will be required to read a variety of texts representing contrasting educational philosophies. The purpose of the course is to promote awareness of the existence of numerous philosophies of education, to demonstrate the practical educational implications derived from each theory, and to assist each student in the formulation of an educational philosophy suitable to the needs of his/her professional and/or personal life. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—260. Educational Psychology-3 credits
This course is intended to help the prospective teacher interact effectively in the social-learning environment that is established between student and teacher and among students in group and in individualized settings. The focus is theoretical as well as applied. Emphasis is on establishing a foundation for making sound and informed educational decisions based on the body of knowledge that pertains to teaching and learning within the framework of human development. Differences between the middle school and high school populations will be explored. As an outcome of the course, the prospective teacher should be able to apply knowledge of the learner, the learning process, and the learning setting to create an environment that offers a diverse student population the greatest opportunity to learn. A twenty-hour field experience is required (Transportation is the responsibility of each student); for students pursuing Siena’s certification sequence, the field experience must be at the secondary level (grades 7-12). Prerequisite: EDUC—210 or permission of the Head of the Department of Education. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—261. Foundations of Language and Literacy-3 credits
The acquisition and development of language is examined as the foundation of literacy. Three populations are studied: native English speakers with intact abilities and with impairments; speakers whose dominant language is not English; and speakers of variants of English. Children and early adolescents are viewed as applying cognitive strategies actively in processing spoken language and in deriving meaning from print. Topics include environmental influences on language and literacy, discourse theory, pragmatics, participation structure, literacy at home and in school, use of writing and of literature to enhance learning, and the impact of technology on literacy. A twenty-hour field experience is required (Transportation is the responsibility of each student); for those pursuing Siena’s certification sequence, the field experience must be at the secondary level (grades 7-12) in a “high needs” school. Prerequisite: Educational Psychology (EDUC—260); or General Psychology (PSYC— 100); or permission of the instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—310. Topics in Education 1-3 credits
This course provides the opportunity to explore changing trends and challenges in America’s schools, to address current issues affecting education, educational issues on the national agenda, state and national initiatives, and/or important developments in areas such as curriculum, instruction, urban education, assessment, or technology. The topic is one not normally investigated in depth in existing courses. This course may be taken more than once with different content. Offered as needed. 1 to 3 credits, depending on the topic. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—350. An Introduction to Educational Research-3 credits
Offered when there is sufficient student interest
The purpose of this course is to explore the area of Educational Research. Emphasis will be placed upon the attitude as well as the function of research including the principles, methods, and strategies useful in planning, designing, and evaluating studies of Education. Students will plan, design, and prepare a proposal that incorporates principles of research. The proposal will, when the opportunity permits, be translated into an empirical study. Prerequisite: EDUC—240. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—360. Adolescence and Schooling-3 credits
Students will review narrative accounts of the school experiences of adolescents from diverse backgrounds. Their first task will be to consider how narrative, empirical, and theoretical knowledge provide different perspectives on understanding the school lives of adolescents. Then, they will examine how cultural canons about adolescence influence the many ways that young people live out their lives in school. They will review and interpret narrative accounts of schooling through fiction, autobiography, movies and self-reflection about adolescence. Students will not be “given the answers” or told what to think about adolescence and schooling. Rather, readings and class presentations will provide them with information and theoretical points of view which sometimes conflict. Ultimately, they will be asked to examine these multiple perspectives to create their own way of viewing adolescents in school settings. A twenty-hour field experience at the middle school or junior high school level is required (Transportation is the responsibility of each student). Prerequisite: EDUC—260 (Educational Psychology); or permission of the instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—365. Exceptional and At-risk Learners-3 credits
This course is intended to serve as an introduction to the study of exceptional children. Students in the course will become familiar with the broad range of exceptionalities from giftedness to retardation. While the main focus will be education of the exceptional person, emphasis will also be placed upon social and legal considerations. The course is recommended for those who are interested in regular classroom teaching as well as special education and school psychology or social work. A twenty- hour field experience working with children who have special needs is required (Transportation is the responsibility of each student). Prerequisite: EDUC—260,or permission of the instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—385. Teaching and Learning in the Middle School-3 credits
The major focus of this course will be on the nature, needs, and characteristics of the adolescent learner, as well as the philosophy, curriculum, and pedagogy (including methods and materials) appropriate for middle-level education in New York State. This course will address diverse instructional strategies, including interdisciplinary teaching, teaming, and cooperative learning. Successful middle-level educational programs, which focus on and promote both the intellectual and personal development of the early adolescent will be examined. A twenty-hour field experience is required at the middle school or junior high school level (Transportation is the responsibility of each student). Prerequisite: EDUC—260 or permission of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—461. Literacy in Middle and High Schools-3 credits
This course is designed to address current issues and practices in literacy development in the content areas at the middle and high school levels. Emphasis is on the responsibility of teachers of all subjects to create a literate environment in their classroom and to develop the literacy skills of students of all ability levels as well as of students who are English language learners. Specific instructional strategies will be explored that enable teachers to engage learners actively with course content, to enhance critical thinking skills and expression of ideas, to promote metacognitive skills and study skills, and to develop critical skills in evaluating sources of information. The utilization of technology and assistive technology to further learning will be stressed. A twenty-hour field experience at the student teaching site is required prior to each student teaching experience. Prerequisite: Admission to the Professional Semester. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—462. Literacy and the Reflective Practitioner Lab- 1 credit
This lab, which accompanies EDUC 462, will meet either on campus or in the field, taking advantage of both college and Professional Development School Network resources. Special topics, including educational technology, diversity, and career advancement will be highlighted. In addition to thoughtful reflection on their own lessons and performance, students will be expected to engage in professional development opportunities available to their P-12 colleagues. Finally, students will be expected to develop skills and resources that will help them secure professional employment. Prerequisites: EDUC 481 and admission to the Professional Sequence. (ATTR: ARTS)


EDUC—481. Instructional Theory & Practice in Inclusive Classrooms-3 credits
This course, which considers the theory and practice of effective instructional practices in diverse classrooms, will focus on the components of instruction and will be practice-oriented and performance-based. Emphasis will be given to the understanding and application of the New York State Student Learning Standards in inclusive subject area classrooms. Such topics as unit planning and lesson planning, motivation, inclusion, diversity, teacher expectations, questioning skills, feedback strategies, methodology, technologies, and evaluation and assessment will be studied. The prospective teacher will develop and practice behaviors and strategies characteristic of effective teaching. Attention will be given to ways to place middle and high school students in more active roles as learners. Students pursuing Siena’s teacher certification program will be required to successfully complete a forty-hour field experience in an inclusive classroom at the secondary level (grades 7-12).

This course is available for all areas of certification. It is open to students seeking certification in French or Spanish in the fall semester only; in Business Marketing in the fall semester only; in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics in the fall semester only; and in Mathematics in the spring semester only.

Prerequisites: EDUC—210, EDUC—260, EDUC—261 and admission to the Professional Sequence. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—482. Instructional Theory and Practice in Inclusive Classrooms Lab-1 credit
This lab, which accompanies EDUC 481, provides prospective teachers with a framework to help them reflect on and improve their teaching skills. Students will study Danielson’s Framework for Teaching and use it to analyze their success within the four domains of planning and preparation, classroom environment, instruction, and professional responsibilities. Prerequisites: Admission to the Professional
Sequence.(ATTR:ARTS)

EDUC—487. Clinical Experience in the Middle School-5 credits
This course will give the prospective teacher sustained experience in the middle school classroom. In addition to teaching, the student is expected to assume other professional responsibilities that are assigned to him/her by the cooperating teacher and/or principal. It is expected that student teachers will gradually add teaching responsibilities and will assume a full teaching load for at least one week. The student will return to the College for scheduled classes or seminars with the College staff. Co-requisite: EDUC—485. Prerequisites: EDUC—481, permission of the Education Department Head (contingent upon maintaining performance standards and the required GPA), and approval by the Education Professions Committee. Note: All students will be personally responsible for transportation arrangements. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—488. Clinical Experience in the High School-5 credits
This course will give the prospective teacher sustained experience in the high school classroom. In addition to teaching, the student is expected to assume other professional responsibilities that are assigned to him/her by the cooperating teacher and/or principal. It is expected that student teachers will gradually add teaching responsibilities and will assume a full teaching load for at least one week. The student will return to the College for scheduled classes or seminars with the College staff. Co-requisite: EDUC—485. Prerequisites: EDUC—481, permission of the Education Department Head, (contingent upon maintaining performance standards and the required GPA), and approval by the Education Professions Committee. Note: All students will be personally responsible for transportation arrangements. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—495. Drug, Alcohol, & Tobacco Workshop-0 credits
This 15-hour workshop is designed to provide the student with knowledge of: physical and psychological addiction to controlled substances; chemical dependency; drugs of abuse; legal issues for teachers; behavioral indicators of substance abuse; goals of a schoolwide substance abuse prevention program; goals of a schoolwide intervention program; curriculum materials on decision-making, coping strategies, and self-esteem; issues of adolescence; and the continuum of services. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Professional Semester. Fee required. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—496. Child Abuse and School Violence Workshop-0 credits
This six-hour workshop is designed to provide the student with knowledge of: the definition of abuse, maltreatment, and neglect according to NYS Family Court Act and Social Services Law; situations requiring reporting of suspected cases of child abuse maltreatment; a description of what constitutes reasonable cause to suspect child abuse or maltreatment; proper procedure for making a report of suspected child abuse; actions mandated reporters may take to protect a child in addition to filing a child abuse report; legal responsibilities in reporting that teachers have as care providers; legal protections afforded reporters and consequences for failing to report; distinctions among various behavioral and physical characteristics of abusive parents and caretakers; physical and behavioral indicators of physical abuse, maltreatment, and neglect; contrast between physical and behavioral indicators of sexual abuse; child abduction; and general principles for interviewing or interacting with child victims. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Professional Semester. Fee required. (ATTR: ARTS)

EDUC—499. Independent Study in Education-1 - 3 credits
Offered when there is sufficient student interest
A qualified student may pursue a particular topic in Education by means of independent research, periodic discussion with the department member concerned, and the development of a satisfactory written report. Approval for independent study must be obtained from the Department Head, and the student will be expected to comply with all College guidelines concerning such projects. (ATTR: ARTS)