Course Offerings

Latin 


LATN—101. Elementary College Latin I 3 credits
An intensive study of Latin grammar and vocabulary with emphasis on learning to read simple Latin.
This is the first course for students offering less than two entranceunits in Latin. A student must
complete LATN—1 01 (or the equivalent) in order to register for LATN—1 02. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
LATN—102. Elementary College Latin II 3 credits
A continuation of LATN—1 01. Prerequisite: LATN—1 01 or permis­sion of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
LATN—201. Intermediate Latin 3 credits
A course consisting of selections from representative classical authors. Important grammatical constructions
are reviewed. This course is recom­mended for students who have completed Elementary Latin. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
LATN—250. Topics in Latin 3 credits
Study of a foundational level topic. Subject matters will be made pub­lic in the official announcements which
precede registration. This course may be taken more than once with different content.
Prerequisite: LATN—201 or permission of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
LATN—300. Advanced Topics in Latin 3 credits
Study of an advanced level topic. Subject matters will be made public in the official announcements which
precede registration. This course may be taken more than once with different content.
Prerequisite: LATN—201 or permission of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
LATN—495. Independent Study in Latin 1 - 3 credits
Qualified students are invited to pursue a special project in Latin of their own choosing,
with the approval of the Department. (ATTR: ARTS) 
 

Greek


GREK—101. Elementary Greek I 3 credits
An intensive study of Ancient Greek grammar and vocabulary with practice in translating simple Greek.
A student must successfully complete GREK—1 01 (or the equivalent)
in order to register for GREK—1 02. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
GREK—102. Elementary Greek II 3 credits
A continuation of GREK—1 01. Prerequisite: GREK—1 01 or per­mission of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
GREK—201. Intermediate Greek 3 credits
This course consists of reading selections from representative authors of Classical Greek, for students
who have completed elementary Greek. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
GREK—250. Topics in Greek 3 credits
Study of a foundational level topic selected on the basis of faculty and student interest. Subject matters
will be made public in the official announcements that precede registration. This course may be taken
more than once with different content. Prerequisite: GREK—201 or permission of the instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
GREK—300. Advanced Topics in Greek 3 credits
Study of an advanced level topic selected on the basis of faculty and student interest. Subject matters
will be made public in the official announcements that precede registration. This course may be taken
more than once with different content. Prerequisite: GREK—201 or permission of the instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
GREK—495. Independent Study in Greek 1 - 3 credits
Qualified students are invited to pursue a special project in Greek of their own choosing, with the
approval of the Department Head. (ATTR: ARTS)
 

Classical Studies


CLSS—105. The Greeks 3 credits
It has often been noted that the Western tradition stands upon two great pillars: the Greco-Roman and the
Judeo-Christian traditions. This course will give the student a broad introduction into the culture and civ­ilization
of the Greek people and how they still influence us. Within the course students will study the broad lines of
Greek history, the major lit­erary figures and their works, the principal ideas and institutions that informed Greek
society, the great achievements in art and architecture, Greek religious practice, and the ways in which the
ancient Greeks live on into the present day and why they still command our attention. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
CLSS—110. The Romans 3 credits
It has often been noted that the Western tradition stands upon two great pillars: the Greco-Roman and the
Judeo-Christian traditions. This course will give the student a broad introduction into the culture and civ­ilization
of the Roman people and how they still influence us.Within the course students will study the broad lines of
Roman history, the major lit­erary figures and their works, the principal ideas and institutions that informed
Roman society, the great achievements in art and architecture, Roman religious practice, and the ways in
which the ancient Romans live on into the present day and why they still command our attention. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
CLSS—210. Women in Antiquity 3 credits
A study, using a variety of methods and differing kinds of material includ­ing tragedies, comedies, lyric poetry,
historical writings, lawcourt speeches, funeral stele, vase and fresco paintings, sculpture, medical treatises,
etc., to recover as clear a reflection of the feminine voice from the Greco-Roman past as possible and to
understand not only the role or position of women in antiquity, but the very meaning of “woman” for the ancients.
Among the works by women writers that are extant we may include the poets Sappho, Corinna, Erinna, Nossis,
and Sulpicia; early Hellenistic treatises attributed to Pythagorean women; private correspondence; Egeria’s
5th-cent. C.E. travel diary. (Same as WSTU—200) (ATTR: ARTS, CAH, WSTU)
 
CLSS—220. Greek Literature in Translation 3 credits
A survey of Greek literature in English translation from the Homeric to the Hellenistic Age.
(Same as ENGL—051) (ATTR:ARTS, CAL, ELIT, ENUL)
 
CLSS—225. Latin Literature in Translation 3 credits
A survey of the literature of Republican and Imperial Rome.
(Same as ENGL—055) (ATTR: ARTS, CAL, ELIT, ENUL)
 
CLSS—240. Greek Archeology and Art 3 credits
An introductory survey focusing on major archeological sites and sig­nificant developments in architecture,
painting, pottery and sculpture from the Minoan-Mycenaean period to the Hellenistic Age. (ATTR: ARTS, CAA)
 
**CLSS—245. Roman Archeology and Art 3 credits
An introductory survey focusing on major archeological sites such as Pompeii and Herculaneum, the topography
and monuments of Rome, and the character of Roman achievements in architecture, painting, sculpture,
engineering, and technology. (ATTR: ARTS, CAA)

***CLSS—250. Topics in Classics 3 credits
Study of a foundational level topic selected on the basis of faculty and student interest. Subject matters will
be made public in the official announcements that precede registration. This course may be taken more than once
with different content. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
**CLSS—260. Gods and Goddesses 3 credits
A study in English of the Greco-Roman myths that treat the origin of the world, the generations of the gods, the
creation of the human race, and the relationship between mortals and immortals. Also examined will be ancient
notions of worship, including the importance of sacrifice and mys­tery cults. Different, contemporary, theoretical
perspectives will be employed to interpret the meaning conveyed by these stories both for the ancients and for
the modern world and to evaluate their force in the devel­opment of Greek and Roman culture, literature, and art
and their subse­quent influence on later peoples. (ATTR: ARTS, CAR)
 
CLSS—265. Heroes and Heroines of Saga 3 credits
A study in English of the Greco-Roman myths that deal with the heroes and heroines of the Greek royal houses,
of the Trojan War, of the journey home; the legends involving Theseus, Heracles, Perseus, and Jason; certain local
traditions of myths; the transformation of the Greek heroic tradition among the Romans, in particular that of the
Trojan Aeneas; the­oretical perspectives will be used to understand ancient conceptions of heroism and how they
have influenced the later tradition. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
CLSS—270. Classical Roots of English 3 credits
A study of etymology and basic linguistics in order to understand the nature and structure of English words derived
primarily from Greek and Latin. The vocabulary of the arts, politics, and humanities is analyzed as well as that of
medicine, law, and the sciences. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
***CLSS—300. Advanced Topics in Classics 3 credits
Study of an advanced level topic selected on the basis of faculty and student interest. Subject matters will be made
public in the official announcements that precede registration. This course may be taken more than once with
different content. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. (ATTR: ARTS)
 
**CLSS—305. Greek Civilization 3 credits
A survey of the social, cultural, and political developments of the Ancient Greeks, beginning with the Minoan-
Mycenaean and continuing from the Homeric through the Hellenistic Age.
(Same as HIST—205) (ATTR: ARTS, CAH, HEUR, PNH)
 
CLSS—306. Roman Civilization 3 credits
A survey of the social, cultural, and political development of Rome from its foundation to the fall of the Empire.
(Same as HIST—206) (ATTR: ARTS, CAH, HEUR, PNH)
 
CLSS—310. Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age 3 credits
Alexander succeeded to the throne of Macedonia (Greece) at the age of twenty. He quickly led his united Greek
forces eastward and within twelve years his empire stretched from Greece in the west to India in the east.Today,
Alexander the Great is recognized by military experts as having been one of the most gifted military strategists
in history.
First, close attention will be paid to Alexander the Great’s military career but we shall also examine
Alexander the man; his character, motives, and philosophical goals. Second, his early death in 323 BCE marked
the birth of the Hellenistic Age, an age that profoundly influenced the history of the western world through its
contact with the Roman empire.We shall devote approximately half the course to the study of the achievements of
the Hellenistic Age, especially the Hellenistic Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt, whose last ruler was Cleopatra VII. A
variety of resources will be used including primary and secondary sources, together with slide presentations.
(ATTR: ARTS, CAH)
 
CLSS—315. Augustus and the Augustan Age 3 credits
By the mid-1st Century BCE, Rome had become the most powerful military and political force in the ancient world.
At that time, Roman ter­ritory stretched from Spain in the west to lands bordering ancient Mesopotamia in the east.
This empire had been won by Rome while under a republican form of government that had existed for over 400 years.
However, at the very point at which Roman power reached its zenith, its republican government collapsed, giving way
to rule by Rome’s first emperor, Augustus.
In this course we will study in detail the political and social conditions that prevailed during this pivotal era in which
Rome was transformed from a republic to a principate. In addition, we will study the literature, art, and architecture
of the Augustan Age. A variety of resources will be used including primary and secondary sources, together with
slide presenta­tions. (ATTR: ARTS, CAH)
 
**CLSS—320. Greek Tragedy 3 credits
A study in English of the masterpieces of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, through a close reading of
individual works of the tragedians and the fruits of modern scholarship. Among the subjects treated will be the
history and origins of Greek tragedy, the physical space of the ancient theater, aspects of performance (the
tragic mask, acting techniques, etc.), the location of individual play within their historical context, and the
later influence of these plays. (ATTR: ARTS, CAL)
 
CLSS—330. Ancient Epic 3 credits
A study of the epic narratives of Greece and Rome, including among others, Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey,
Apollonius’ Argonautica, Vergil’s Aeneid, and Ovid’s Metamorphoses. A variety of interpretive approaches will be
used in a close reading of the primary texts.The course will focus on the development and transformation of the
epic tradition throughout the course of antiquity, its shifting focus, themes, values, methods, cultural assumptions,
and its legacy to western civilization. (ATTR: ARTS, CAL)
 
CLSS—340. Late Antiquity 3 credits
The study of Late Antiquity will investigate the fundamental period of transition from the classical to medieval
world as it was experienced across the Mediterranean. Spanning the crises of the Late Roman Empire to its
disintegration, it will encompass diverse areas of inquiry: the establishment of Christianity within the Roman
empire; the barbarian migrations and the ensuing destabilization of the Roman Empire in the west; the
emer­gence of the papacy and the rise of the Frankish king, Charlemagne as a new emperor; the continuity
of the Roman Empire in the east through the successors of Augustus who ruled the “Byzantine” Empire
from Constantinople; the emergence of the Islamic caliphate and the founding of Bagdad.
Same as HIST—337. (ATTR: ARTS, HEUR, MRST, PNH)
 
CLSS—360. The Spartans 3 credits
Students will study the history and culture of Sparta from its begin­nings ca. 1,000 BCE to its eventual collapse
in the 4th Century BCE.The name Sparta has survived in the cultural memory of the west for more than 2,000
years in no small part due to its reputation for heroism and military might.We will examine the character of
Spartan society and its emphasis on the heroic ideal. Students will learn how this ideal evolved, and how it
enabled Sparta to become the most powerful state in ancient Greece.We will learn that Sparta’s truly unique
military, social and political systems came at a heavy price; this aspect of Spartan culture will constitute
another major focus of the course. Our examination of Sparta and its history will be based on evidence derived
from primary sources, archaeology, art and secondary sources. (Same as HIST—338) (ATTR: ARTS, HEUR, PNH)
 
CLSS—495. Independent Study in Classics 1 - 3 credits
Qualified students are invited to pursue a special project in Classics of their own choosing, and with the approval of the Department. (ATTR: ARTS)
 

** This course is taught in English. It fulfills a core requirement but does not fulfill a foreign Language requirement.
*** Offered when there is sufficient student interest.