MRKT 326 Sales Management Course Guide

Catalog Description
 

MKMG—326. Sales Management (3 credits)
This course aims to accomplish four main objectives:

  1. To delineate the areas in which sales executives make decisions;
  2. To analyze and evaluate sales management decision making criteria and processes;
  3. To engage students in a presentation designed to relate the text materials to sales management situations;
  4. In addition to the above, students will be introduced to an overview of basic principles of selling. Prerequisite: MKMG—212. (ATTR: BUS)


One out of every nine people who are fully employed in the U.S. is a salesperson. About one trillion dollars is spent every year on this critical marketing investment. Salespeople have been known to out-earn their managers and even the CEO. Why? Because they drive the top line. Every senior management team must deliver its revenue and profit numbers. They look to their salesforce to help them achieve this objective. This course, by choice, is expected to illustrate and enrich business complexities awaiting our graduates if they decide to pursue selling and relationship management with the sophistication it deserves.

A sales professional is at the forefront of facing the demands of metamorphosing markets and building lasting relationships. Relationship management is a complex function rendered even more so due to increased globalization, changes in competitive structures, speed of communication, increased amounts of information, and increasing customer demands for real-time quick responses. Successful sales professionals in the twenty-first century will exhibit the twin qualities of understanding markets and marketing, and building customer relationships based on effective problem solving.


Course Description
 

This course focuses on the strategic and tactical aspects of selling and salesforce management. It is appropriate for students who are interested in careers in sales and sales management or who will work for companies whose revenues and profits depend upon a productive salesforce.

As the catalog description suggests, this is not a course in personal selling; this is a course in relationship and sales management. It will focus on providing the perquisite knowledge and skills needed to be effective sales managers. However, being an effective sales manager almost always demands a firm understanding of the selling process itself. It is impossible to grasp the subtle complexities of managing salespeople without an empathetic understanding of personal selling.

Today, more than ever, sales managers are expected to understand and implement complex competitive strategies. This course is expected to address serious questions that face our graduates. What should we as salespeople and sales managers be doing in light of a changing world around us? What are our business objectives? Legal responsibilities? Moral obligations? Ethical duties? Are these all mutually exclusive and inherently competing paradigms?

Throughout the course a strategic perspective should used to develop an analytical understanding of the concepts, tools, and techniques of sales management, using “real-world” marketing problems. Issues concerning international dimensions, social responsibility, and ethical considerations as they relate to sales management should receive special attention.

Course Objectives

 

  1. To develop an understanding of the basic concepts related to sales management and the strategic marketing factors affecting the direction, intensity, and timing of the strategic decisions in selling and sales management.
  2. To develop an appreciation for the dynamics of the marketplace and how strategic decisions concerning sales function of a firm relate to these changes.
  3. To develop an understanding for the integration of essential variables which affect the development of selling and sales management strategies.
  4. To develop student capacity to work in groups and integrate knowledge of selling and sales management concepts and applications into a composite and usable whole; as evidenced by mini projects and/or term projects.
  5. To provide students with opportunities for practicing the theoretical concepts learned in the class meetings under conditions as realistic as possible through the use of a mix of case studies, role-plays, scenarios, and simulations.
  6. To develop an understanding of the basic concepts related to sales management and the strategic marketing factors affecting the direction, intensity, and timing of the strategic decisions in selling and sales management.
  7. To develop an appreciation for the dynamics of the marketplace and how strategic decisions concerning sales function of a firm relate to these changes.
  8. To develop an understanding for the integration of essential variables which affect the development of selling and sales management strategies.
  9. To develop student capacity to work in groups and integrate knowledge of selling and sales management concepts and applications into a composite and usable whole; as evidenced by mini projects and/or term projects.
  10. To provide students with opportunities for practicing the theoretical concepts learned in the class meetings under conditions as realistic as possible through the use of a mix of case studies, role-plays, scenarios, and simulations.


Assessable Learning Outcomes


At the conclusion of this course, the students should be able to:

  1. Understand and discuss the strategic role of the sales force function and its relationship to the overall marketing strategy
  2. Understand and discuss the principles of planning, implementation, and control as they relate to the specific area of sales force management
  3. Understand and discuss the principles of salesforce recruitment and selection
  4. Understand and discuss the principles of salesforce compensation and training
  5. Understand and discuss the principles of ethical and legal issues faced by contemporary salesforce
  6. Understand and discuss the principles of personal selling and relationship building
  7. Understand and discuss the principles of salesforce prospecting and salescall planning
  8. Understand and discuss the principles of effective salescalls
  9. Additionally, the student will have gained experience in significant decision-making and problem-solving skills in a simulated sales management environment


Suggested Teaching Methodology


A mix of lectures, discussions, exercises, problem assignments, group projects, computer-based simulations, role-playing exercises, and cases could be used as pedagogical tools. To benefit fully from the course students should be expected to assume the role of active participants.


Prerequisite Knowledge and Skills


This upper level marketing course can be taken during the third or fourth year of the marketing and management degree program. Students must have attained the learning objectives of MKMG-212, Marketing. Specifically, they must demonstrate an understanding of the core concepts of marketing, verbal, non-verbal, and written communication skills, and a basic understanding of marketing ethics and social responsibility. Further, students should be able to function productively in a team, demonstrating leadership capabilities when appropriate. Students must be able to utilize computer software to prepare professional looking documents and presentations.

Specific Prerequisite Course
MKMG-212 Marketing.


Recommended Student Assessment Measures


Class Participation: Class participation score is based on instructor judgment of three P's: Preparation, Presence, and Participation. If students find it uncomfortable to speak up in class, perhaps alternative ways of contributing to the class may be designed and evaluated.
Examinations: Exams covering content areas could be given during the semester. These examinations could have any combination of true/false identifications, multiple-choice questions, essay questions, and problems. All exams will be based on class lectures, discussions, exercises, cases, assignments and the required textbooks and reading material.
Student Projects: Any combination of mini-projects or more elaborate term projects may be used to gauge the analytical and integrative knowledge and skills of the students. Such projects may be assigned individually or in student teams. The raison d’être of such projects would be to create “real world” situations in which students are expected to make strategic decisions and enjoy (suffer?!) the consequences of such decisions.


Academic Integrity


Student-teacher relationships are built on trust. Any student found violating this trust undermines the educational process and is subject to significant disciplinary action.

The concept of academic integrity lies at the very heart of any college. This is particularly true of Siena with its strong Franciscan tradition and its dedication to fostering sound moral growth. In such an environment, academic dishonesty cannot be tolerated. Students who commit such acts expose themselves to punishments as severe as dishonorable dismissal from the college. Academic dishonesty can take different forms, including, but not limited to, cheating (dishonesty in a test situation), plagiarism (dishonesty in the presentation of materials in a paper or report), and computer abuse. In any situation in which a student is unsure of what constitutes academic dishonesty, it is the student's responsibility to raise the question with his or her instructor. It is also the student's responsibility to be familiar with the student guidelines on academic honesty, "Academic Integrity and the Siena Student." Alleging ignorance of what constitutes academic dishonesty or of the College's policy on the subject will not be considered a valid explanation or excuse.

The Siena Committee on Academic Integrity hears cases of alleged academic dishonesty. This student/faculty committee reviews evidence for and against the accused. If the student is found guilty, the committee will determine the appropriate sanction(s), which may include failure of the course, suspension from the College, or permanent dismissal. A statement of the reasons for such sanctions will be placed in the student’s file. Alleging ignorance of what constitutes academic dishonesty or of the College’s policy on the subject will not be considered a valid explanation or excuse.

Although it is presumed that students adhere to all academic integrity guidelines, instructors are to institute specific measures to assure compliance. All submissions will be screened for plagiarism and other violations of academic integrity.


Statement of Expectations


This upper-level marketing course will delve into the topic of sales management in significant depth. To further the learning experience, students are required to complete a variety of assignments and projects. As such, not all learning will take place in the classroom. Students are required to invest time outside of the classroom to adequately learn the material. It is expected that, in addition to the three hours spent in class, students will invest approximately ten to twelve hours per week reading, studying, meeting with their group, and completing course requirements.