MGMT 211 Management Principles Course Guide

 

Course Description
 

Management Principles provides students with a fundamental understanding of how organizations function and the roles managers play within and across organizations. This course introduces students to six management competencies: decision making and planning, innovation and entrepreneurship, teamwork and leadership, communication, human resource development and process and project management. The course facilitates the development of the conceptual knowledge and applied skills students will need to manage an increasingly diverse workforce and to lead with integrity in a changing global environment. Cases, simulations, organizational study and/or service learning projects will be used to provide students an experiential format for learning.  
 

Learning Outcomes
 

Students will demonstrate a fundamental knowledge and minimal ability to apply the six management competencies.

1.       Decision Making and Planning: gather and analyze information, define problems and opportunities, evaluate alternatives, and recommend actions that consider profit, people, and the planet.

2.       Innovation and Entrepreneurship: encourage creative and diverse opinions, take calculated risks, and promote new ideas and concepts.

3.       Teamwork and Leadership: participate in ways that encourage others to share their time and unique talents; develop as an individual, explore your strengths and weaknesses, and seek opportunities for continual growth; lead with integrity in a complex, changing, global environment. 

4.       Communication: use all forms of communication to inform, influence, and motivate diverse audiences.

5.       Human Resource Development: recruit, select, develop, and motivate a diverse workforce to achieve organizational goals.

6.       Process and Project Management: scope, organize, schedule, monitor and control the execution of complex processes and projects.
 

Course Outline
 

Students will be introduced to the historical approaches to management theory and practice and will develop an understanding of the fundamental precursors to reasoned human action. Students will then explore how this conceptual model can be employed to manage effectively and ethically in a diverse and global environment. Students develop and apply their knowledge of management theory and practice through the introduction of the six management competencies. Students then learn each of the competencies in the context of three categories of management activity: thinking about work, working with others and getting work done. Common content is listed with each competency.

Managers and the Management Environment

·         Historical Approaches to Management

·         Precursors to Human Action (values, attitudes, emotions, traits and culture)

·         Ethics, Diversity and Globalization

Thinking       

·         Decision Making and Planning (prescriptive and descriptive approaches to decision making, reflection and learning, types/levels of planning)

·         Innovation and Entrepreneurship (encouraging and capitalizing on creativity, risk taking and risk management)

Working with others

·         Teamwork and Leadership (motivation; team roles, behaviors and processes; power, influence, leadership traits and behaviors)

·         Communication (influences of sender, receiver, message, media and environment; characteristics of effective oral and written communication; seeking and receiving feedback; employing information technology)

Getting work done

·         Human Resources Development (human resources management, organization change, feedback systems for improving human performance)

·         Process and Project Management (organizational design and structure, operations management, scheduling, information technology and control systems)

 

Recommended Teaching Methodology
 

To keep the course engaging and to address the wide variety of student learning preferences, instructors will use an assortment of pedagogical methods. Students should be encouraged to read, reflect on and apply concepts as a way to prepare for class discussions. Prepared students will reduce the amount of class time dedicated to lectures about the concepts, terms and theories, and allow more class time for activities and exercises that require students to apply course content.  Teaching methods such as group work, library and electronic media research, case analysis and discussions, experiential exercises, current event discussions, and service learning can be used to give students the opportunity to apply course content. The readings will come from the required text as well as relevant materials obtained from current periodicals and publications. Class discussions will be centered on relating the outside readings to the textbook materials. 

The Franciscan Concern/Diversity must be addressed in a substantive way at least three distinct times during the course. The course should focus on the application of the six management competencies in a way that requires students to explore multiple perspectives, affirm individual rights and appreciate individual differences and differences among groups of people. An interactive case, simulation, organization study, or problem based service learning opportunity can be used to guide students through the complexities of managing in a diverse and global environment. Through reading, in-class discussions and exercises, and out-of-class projects or case studies, students will learn to appreciate and respond to the needs, attitudes, beliefs and values that diverse people bring to an organization. Students will learn how they as managers of diverse people and as members of diverse teams can act in ways that are receptive to individual differences and employ the experiences, skills and talents of diverse people to the benefit of the organization. Students learn how effectively managing diversity makes good business sense in that it provides stronger connections between the organization and its increasingly diverse customers, helps retain and motivate valued employees which both reduces hiring costs and increases effectiveness and efficiency, and avoids costly lawsuits or damage to the organization’s reputation. Students will learn how they can serve as an effective role model to others in the organizations through their interactions with others who are different from themselves and response to ideas different from their own. Students learn how organizational systems, policies and procedures have discriminated against or disregarded diverse people in the past; and learn how these can be altered to promote the inclusion and fair treatment of diverse people and the discussion or diverse points of view. Students also learn how to coordinate and cooperate with diverse individuals and constructively deal with conflicts that arise due to real and perceived concerns about access to limited resources or opportunities.

This course is the primary course in the School of Business core curriculum to instruct students on team member skills and effective use of teams. The course should provide many opportunities for students to learn and apply team concepts in various modes including combinations that emphasize collocated, distributed, synchronous and asynchronous interactions.

The approaches outlined below will be used individually or in combination to provide students an experiential format for learning:

  1. A case or simulation where students are given information on a specific organization at several points during the semester. Students conduct analyses, make an oral or written presentation, and receive feedback from the instructor throughout the process.

  2. A live case, in which a guest business executive visits the classroom several times during the semester to discuss managing in diverse and global environment. The initial visit provides an overview of the organization and an introduction to key challenges faced by the organization. Subsequent visits could focus on the three major categories of management activity.

  3. An organization study where students apply concepts from the class to an organization.

  4. A problem based service learning project where student teams work with a community partner throughout the semester to learn about that organization’s unique challenges in fulfilling its mission. Students work closely with community partner representatives to learn how they employ management competencies. Students complete a semester long project that allows them to practice management competencies and provide tangible service to the community.

Regardless of the approach chosen, students should be provided opportunities to gather information, conduct analyses, and create products both individually and in teams. Class discussions should provide opportunities for students to share progress made and problems encountered, and seek suggestions from the professor and classmates. Self-assessments and group exercises can be used to encourage students to evaluate and analyze their own perceptions and attitudes toward those who are different from themselves.


Recommended Assessment Measures
 

Outcomes 1 through 6: Multiple-choice and short answer tests, or short essays/reflective papers will be used to assess students’ ability to articulate and apply management theories and practices associated with the six competencies to manage a diverse workforce in a global environment.

Outcomes1, 2 and 6: A written proposal that applies competencies to a potential organizational problem and requires students to explore multiple perspectives, affirm individual rights and appreciate individual differences and differences among groups of people or written summary that reflects on the student’s lessons learned during the application of these competencies to a class project and the challenges faced working with diverse members of their team. Instructors are encouraged to use elements of the Franciscan Concerns Diversity Rubric (Attachment 1) when evaluating this assignment.

Outcome 3: Instructor and peer evaluation of student participation in team activities that employ the School of Business Teamwork and Leadership Rubric (Attachment 2); and a short writing assignment that encourages students to reflect on team experiences. An example short reflective writing assignment could be: “During this semester, you have had opportunities to participate in team activities and receive feedback from your peers. Use the objectives and behaviors listed in the teamwork and leadership rubric (attached) to describe two examples of how you improved your ability to contribute to and lead teams this semester. Provide specific examples of your actions and their consequences. Describe two ways that you might change your behavior in the future to become an even more effective team member.” Instructors are encouraged to use elements of the School of Business Lifelong Learning Rubric (Attachment 3) when evaluating this assignment.

Outcome 4: Evaluation of writing effectiveness will occur in concert with measurement of other desired outcomes. Instructors will provide students the opportunity to write, receive feedback from faculty and/or peers, and transfer that feedback to subsequent writing assignments. Assignments could include revising and resubmitting a single paper, feedback on a paper written in increments, or feedback on separate assignments that reinforce a common structure (e.g., reflection papers, case analyses). Instructors are encouraged to use elements of the School of Business Writing Rubric (Attachment 4) when evaluating this assignment.
 

Statement of Expectations


This course is required for all students in the School of Business. The knowledge and skills students gain in this course will enhance their understanding of how organizations operate and the roles managers assume in organizations. The information covered in this course will be developed at more advanced levels in subsequent courses. 

Students are expected to come prepared for class discussion and activities and to participate in class actively. Class time will be used to apply the course content to business situations.

 

Academic Integrity

 

Student-teacher relationships are built on trust. Any student found violating this trust undermines the educational process and is subject to significant disciplinary action.  

The concept of academic integrity lies at the very heart of any college. This is particularly true of Siena with its strong Franciscan tradition and its dedication to fostering sound moral growth. In such an environment, academic dishonesty cannot be tolerated. Students who commit such acts expose themselves to punishments as severe as dishonorable dismissal from the college. Academic dishonesty can take different forms, including, but not limited to, cheating (dishonesty in a test situation), plagiarism (dishonesty in the presentation of materials in a paper or report), and computer abuse. In any situation in which a student is unsure of what constitutes academic dishonesty, it is the student's responsibility to raise the question with his or her instructor. It is also the student's responsibility to be familiar with the student guidelines on academic honesty, "Academic Integrity and the Siena Student." Alleging ignorance of what constitutes academic dishonesty or of the College's policy on the subject will not be considered a valid explanation or excuse. 

Students suspected of violating academic integrity will be referred to the Academic Integrity Committee for final determination. 
 

Prerequisite Knowledge

 

MGMT 211 is a required course in the Business Core and Management Minor. There are no prerequisites.

Institutional Mechanism for Providing Feedback for Continuous Quality Improvement

Assessment review is done annually by the Management Department and each semester by faculty members. The assessment results for each learning outcome will be analyzed and any deficiencies in the achievement of the learning outcomes will be addressed. Appropriate changes will be made in the process in order to improve students’ mastery of the learning objectives.


Attachment 1

 

Siena College Core                                                                                                                                                            Franciscan Concerns Rubric – Diversity

 

Student:                                                                                                                                             

Date:

Assignment:

 

    

 

Learning Goal: Student will demonstrate appropriate cognitive and affective ability that engages many cultures influenced by a Franciscan appreciation of diversity.

 

           

 

OBJECTIVES

Does not meet standards

Meets standards

Exceeds standards

Cultural self-awareness

Show minimal awareness of own cultural rules and biases (even those shared with own cultural groups (e.g. uncomfortable with identifying possible cultural differences with others)

Identifies own cultural rules and biases (e.g. with a strong preference for those rules shared with own cultural group and seeks the same in others.)

Articulates insights into own cultural rules and bias (e.g. seeking complexity; aware of how one’s experiences has shaped these rules and how to recognize and respond to cultural biases, resulting in a shift in self-description.)

Knowledge of cultural worldview frameworks

 

Demonstrates surface understanding of the elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices.

Demonstrates adequate understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices.

Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of the complexity of elements important to members of another culture in relation to its history, values, politics, communication styles, economy, or beliefs and practices

Skills: Empathy

 

View the experience of others but does so through own cultural worldview.

Recognizes intellectual and emotional dimensions of more than one worldview and sometimes uses more than one worldview in interactions.

Interprets intercultural experience from the perspectives of own and more than one worldview and demonstrates ability to act in a supportive manner that recognizes the feelings of another cultural group.

Attitudes: Curiosity

 

States minimal interest in learning more about other cultures.

Sometimes asks deeper question is about other cultures and seeks out answers to those questions but generally asks simple or surface questions.

Asks complex questions about other cultures, seeks out and articulates answers to those questions which reflect multiple cultural perspectives.

 

 


 

Attachment 2

 

School of Business                                                                                                                                                                             Teamwork/Leadership Rubric

 

 

Student:                                                                                                                                             

Date:

Assignment:

OBJECTIVES

Does not meet standards

Meets standards

Exceeds standards

Contributes to Task

 

Distracted with unrelated activities. Introduces extraneous information.

Shares relevant information/valuable opinions. Builds on and integrates efforts of others.

Shares relevant information/valuable opinions. Builds on and integrates efforts of others. Questions or challenges assumptions. Identifies next steps/offers further assistance.

Manages Process

Takes group off track. Appears unaware of time constraints.

 

Helps define tasks. Monitors progress.

Helps define tasks. Monitors progress. Sets agenda and organizes work. Helps team make necessary adjustments.

Cooperates

Defensive. Interrupts or contradicts others.

Shows respect for others. Compromises when in best interest of team.

Shows respect for others. Compromises when in best interest of team. Resolves differences and manages conflict. Helps team reach consensus.

Includes Others

Dominates discussion. Devalues other’s contributions.

 

Encourages others to contribute. Seeks information and opinions from others.

Encourages others to contribute. Seeks information and opinions from others. Involves others in decision making. Coordinates team efforts.

 

Attachment 3

 


 

School of Business                                                                                                                                                                             Lifelong Learning Rubric

 

 

Student:                                                                                                                                             

Date:

Assignment:

 

 

 

OBJECTIVES

Does not meet standards

Meets standards

Exceeds standards

Reflection

No assessment of current strengths, weaknesses, values, passions or goals.

Considers current strengths, weaknesses, values, passions or goals.

Insightfully considers current strengths, weaknesses, values, passions or goals.

Initiative

 

Shows limited interest in independently pursuing activities that could enhance knowledge, skills and abilities.

Independently pursues activities that could enhance knowledge, skills and abilities.

Takes advantage of many opportunities to expand knowledge, skills and abilities.

Transfer

Shows limited ability to connect concepts or apply experience to novel situations.

Makes connections between varied concepts and applies experience to novel situations.

Integrates concepts from a variety of learning experiences and insightfully applies experience to novel situations.

 

 


 

Attachment 4

School of Business                                                                                                                                                                             Writing Rubric

 

Student:                                                                                                                                             

Date:

Assignment:

OBJECTIVES

Does not meet standards

Meets standards

Exceeds standards

Statement of topic/purpose/claim

None stated

Clearly defined; some focus or specificity

Clearly defined, focused, specific, compelling and debatable

Supports and explains assertions

Weak or absent evidence and persuasive support; little or poor explanation

Relevant, concrete and persuasive support for most debatable assertions; good explanations

Relevant, concrete and persuasive support for every assertion; shows depth, complexity, and creativity

Effectively uses resources

Uses limited resources; relies predominantly on sweeping generalizations or trite ideas

Uses multiple and reliable sources which are assessed at a basic level with only some critical assessment

Uses multiple and reliable sources which are assessed critically

Achieves purpose

Purpose is not achieved; many assignment requirements have not been fulfilled

Purpose is achieved; most assignment requirements fulfilled

Purpose fully achieved; could be a model of how to fulfill assignment

Uses language appropriate for audience and uses terms correctly

Language is totally inappropriate for audience; terms used incorrectly

Mostly appropriate; uses terms correctly

Vocabulary varied and appropriate; terms used correctly

Organization

No suggested organization of points; wanders throughout; reader can not follow points; no conclusion

Most information logical and appropriate for purpose; predominately clear transitions; coherently ends with conclusions based on evidence

Ideas and information follow logical sequencing with seamless transitions; logical, effective, and relevant conclusion and summary of main points

Paragraph structure

No evident points developed within paragraphs; no transitions between paragraphs

Most paragraphs have main points; transitions between paragraphs

Ideas organized within paragraphs and connected with highly effective transitions

Spelling, punctuation, grammar, and sentence structure

Violates conventions of business writing; writing interferes with comprehension

Some sentence variety; adequate usage of grammar, and punctuation

Superior facility with conventions of business writing; wide variety of sentence structures

References/citations

Research support incorrectly quoted, paraphrased, or cited

Research support adequately quoted, paraphrased, and cited

Research support correctly quoted, paraphrased, and cited; integrated seamlessly

Presentation

Unprofessional presentation of writing; inappropriate format for audience

Presentation of written material and format is appropriate for audience

Professionally prepared, appropriate format for purpose; the author took time to prepare a quality presentation of the written product

Illustrating data

Confusing, incorrect, or no presentation of data

Data primarily clear, meaningful, related to body, and in appropriate format

Data clear, meaningful, related to body, and in appropriate format; creates visual interest